When I have a busy, long day, sometimes the last thing I want to do is open my Bible. It’s not that I’m running away from God, but it takes more thought when I’m already tired. And it’s yet another thing getting in the way of just doing what I want to do. I spend all day doing everything for everyone else–by the time I have a few minutes to myself, I want to just do what I feel like doing.  However, I’ve noticed a pattern: when I’m more consistent about turning my focus on God, rather than myself, I

If I were to ask your kids what you tell them the most, what would they say? Mine would probably answer with phrases like: Have you emptied the dishwasher yet? Why aren’t you dressed? Get off your sister’s head! While those are things I need to repeat over and over, I hope they’re also hearing the more positive messages I make an effort to try to repeat: I love you so much. I’m proud of you. God created you and designed you intentionally. He doesn’t make mistakes. Jesus loves you even more than Daddy and I do! I tell them

If your family is like mine, when you’re trying to shuffle the kids out the door, there’s a lot of chaos, bickering, barking, and frustration. And usually everything is heightened because we’re already running late and I’m trying to hurry. That’s the keyword there: hurry . I find I’m constantly trying to do more than I can, not allowing tasks to take the amount of time they take, and then getting frustrated I’m running behind. I also have a tendency to get distracted, so that just slows me down even more. Then I try to compensate by hurrying everyone along

This might seem odd for you to hear from me, especially since I’m known for my annoyingly optimistic nature sometimes. But over the years I’ve heard our culture say over and over again: Do what makes you happy. Don’t worry, be happy. If it doesn’t make you happy, it’s not worth it. You deserve to be happy. God Doesn’t Want You to Be Happy There was a time of my life where I bought into this cultural message. I thought God wanted me to be happy. But the more I’ve learned, the more I’ve realized happiness shouldn’t be my goal

What’s the best way to teach our children? I’m not a teacher and I have no formal training whatsoever, but if I were to guess, I would probably say a lot depends on the child’s personality, where they are in their development, and whether they learn best by seeing, hearing, or doing. However, I was listening to this Brant and Sherri Oddcast episode the other day, and they pointed out how Jesus taught: he asks questions, tells stories, and lets people wrestle with the meaning. And he didn’t have set “classroom times” and “office hours.” He taught them wherever they